IID

IID Board Directors Javier Gonzalez (center left, kneeling) and J.B. Hamby (second from right of tree), and IID Water Safety Mascot Dippy Duck, join IID, San Diego State University, City of Calexico, AmeriCorps, and IBEW Local 465 representatives in planting a Chinese Elm on the University campus Friday, April 30, marking Arbor Day.

IMPERIAL COUNTY — Members of the Imperial Irrigation District Board of Directors planted trees at various locations in the District’s service area this week, to promote and commemorate National Arbor Day, according to a press release.

Recognized on the last Friday in April, Arbor Day is observed throughout the Nation and the world to encourage people and communities to plant trees on or around the holiday.

“Shade trees encourage energy conservation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve quality of life, and provide many other benefits for the customers and communities they serve,” said IID Board President James Hanks. “We want to encourage our customers, our communities and agencies within the IID water and energy service areas to observe this special day with COVID-19 appropriate tree planting activities so more people can experience these benefits.”

Directors planted trees this week at IID’s Brawley and El Centro pay stations, Northend Division, and on the San Diego State University campus in Calexico.

In addition to planting trees this week, in early April, the IID Board of Directors passed a resolution calling for 300 trees to be planted on District property over the next three years.

The use of trees, through providing shade and moderating temperature extremes, promote energy conservation by reducing the energy necessary to cool buildings and homes during hot summer days, thereby reducing the risk for load shedding during peak summer energy demand.

Trees planted as hedge rows, or windbreaks, also improve conditions for adjacent crops and air quality by reducing wind speed and provide essential habitat for wildlife, including many listed, threatened, and endangered species.

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