Little Sisters of the Poor’s Case Will Be Argued before Supreme Court Tomorrow

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Little Sisters of the Poor
Little Sisters of the Poor

WASHINGTON, DC – Tomorrow the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in the Little Sisters of the Poor’s legal challenge to the ObamaCare requirement that nonchurch religious organizations must provide contraceptive and abortion-inducing drugs and devices at no cost to the employees. The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against Little Sisters and upheld the mandate. During the 90-minute hearing, the Supreme Court will also hear arguments on six other cases representing Christian colleges, ministries, and businesses. The courts of appeal that heard those cases also all upheld the mandate against the employers.

Little Sisters, a group of nuns dedicated to serving the elderly poor, argues that the ObamaCare mandate violates their free exercise rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. On January 11, 2016, Liberty Counsel filed an amicus brief on behalf of Little Sisters of the Poor. Liberty Counsel filed the first private lawsuit against ObamaCare the day it was signed into law in 2010.

“Little Sisters of the Poor and many other religious, nonprofit organizations cannot and will not participate in killing innocent children,” said Mat Staver, Founder and Chairman of Liberty Counsel. “The federal government should never force Christian ministries to violate their faith in order to continue their mission. The Obama Administration’s HHS mandate compels Little Sisters of the Poor to act against their sincerely held religious beliefs or face crippling fines that would end their ministry. The Court must reaffirm America’s historic commitment to religious liberty or restrict its free exercise for decades to come,” said Staver.

“This case brings into focus the importance of replacing Justice Scalia with a Justice who will adhere to the original meaning of the Constitution. If the Court splits 4-4, then there is no final decision. That would mean the Christian groups, including Little Sisters of the Poor, will lose. In the event the Court evenly splits, the Justices could also decide to rehear the cases when Justice Scalia’s seat is filled,” Staver said.