Illegal immigrant children get first-class treatment at taxpayers’ expense

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Photo by: Ross D. Franklin Detainees watched a World Cup match from a cell where hundreds of immigrant children were being processed earlier this year. (Associated Press photographs)
Photo by: Ross D. Franklin
Detainees watched a World Cup match from a cell where hundreds of immigrant children were being processed earlier this year. (Associated Press photographs)

By Stephen Dinan and S.A. Miller – The Washington Times 

From culturally sensitive music to special meals for the lactose intolerant, the organizations the federal government is paying to house and care for the children who have surged across the border illegally are taking pains to make sure they are as comfortable as possible.

Dietitians scrutinize the menus each day to make sure they include enough whole grains but not whole milk. Counselors offer life skills classes in Spanish, and intensive English language training, including use of the Rosetta Stone program. Doctors and dentists treat the children at taxpayers’ expense — often the first medical care of the children’s lives.

The children also are guaranteed phone privileges, including the right to call back to their home countries.

Some facilities go above and beyond.

Yolo County, California, which has a grant to house several dozen of the children in its juvenile detention facility, provides an intercom system in each bedroom so children can talk with staff, but the system “also provides the opportunity for youths to listen to music that is sensitive to culture and preference.”

The federal government has been hush-hush about many aspects of housing and caring for the children. It has refused to provide a list of the 100 or so nonfederal facilities where the children are being sheltered.

But documents from the program give a glimpse of the breadth and scope of the effort, which is eating up an ever-larger portion of the Health and Human Services Department’s budget, jumping from $305.9 million last year to $671.3 million so far in fiscal year 2014.

The biggest grants this year are going to Baptist Child & Family Services, which is being paid $280.2 million; Southwest Key Programs Inc., at $122.3 million; and International Educational Services Inc., at $55 million. Translation services and charter airlines also are making millions of dollars from contracts to transport the children around the country, and to help overcome language barriers.

The Washington Times submitted Freedom of Information Act requests early last month seeking copies of the largest grants, but those have yet to be fulfilled.

 

 

1 COMMENT

  1. The whole world gets our tax’s….some is misused, and some is used for War…..you know, kill, cripple children. Why name names?

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